Writing with the Right Words

Tale of Two Cities--Opening LineNothing is as profound as a simple truth eloquently expressed. And that’s where we, as writers, come in. We take simple truth and make it profound by the way we express it. We must craft our words in such a way that the reader slaps his forehead and wonders if we just cleverly revealed something new or if we creatively told him something he already knew.

I will leave you today with one of these simple truths because the writer so eloquently crafted it that it struck me upside the head with the force of the proverbial two-by-four.

I was reading the July/August issue of Writer’s Digest. This is the magazine’s “Creativity Issue” and the line that struck me was the first sentence in an article entitled, “Making More Room for Writing” by Amy Sue Nathan. Here is her brilliant opening line:

“Writing is done in the time we make,

not the time we find.”

BAM! Say no more. My head hurts from the impact of this simple, but eloquently expressed 13-word sentence. We all know this simple truth but look how succinctly, yet creatively, Amy expressed it. Short. Sweet. Potent. And full of meaning. She’s right; we’ll never find extra time to write. We must make it. Carve it out. Sacrifice something else. Manage the clock.

Albert Einstein once said, “Creativity is the creating of the new and the rearranging of the old in a new way.” Much of our creative writing will be the “rearranging of the old in a new way.”

In the next piece you write keep this in mind. If you are expressing a familiar truth, how can you craft it in an eloquent way that cuts through the clutter and speaks powerfully to your readers?

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Related posts on this blog:

When is the best time to write? (Type “time” in the search bar at right.)
What hinders your dream to write? (Type “clock” in the search bar at right.)

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Published in: on June 13, 2015 at 1:18 pm  Leave a Comment  
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